you are taken to have received this letter

(I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice. It is a discussion of a linguistic issue arising from one Australian government department procedure.)

A government department which changes name every few years is responsible for granting or refusing Australian migrant and refugee visas. Unsuccessful applicants in specified visa classes can apply to an independent body called the Administrative Appeals Tribunal for a review of the department’s decision, but they must do so within 28 days of receiving notification of their unsuccessful application.

The department’s letter to unsuccessful applicants is not helpful. Notably, it doesn’t state the date by which unsuccessful applicants must apply; they are expected to figure it out for themselves (though many are represented by an agent or lawyer). Some unsuccessful applicants lose their chance for a review by applying too late.

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intends genuinely

(I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice. It is a discussion of a linguistic issue arising from one piece of Australian legislation.)

Clause 500 of the Australian Migration Regulations covers student visas. One of the requirements is that “the applicant intends genuinely to stay in Australia temporarily” (that is, it is not a permanent visa). The wording intends genuinely struck me as awkward. Throughout the Regulations, intends genuinely is used four times, alongside genuinely intends 12 times and genuinely intend twice.

The linguistic questions which arise are: is intends genuinely ungrammatical, if so, why; and if is it grammatical, why does it sound so awkward?

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